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Masterclass - Tubeless puncture repair

Posted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 2:54 pm
by jessplop
It’s Saturday evening, and you’ve arranged to go for a run, bright and early the following moroning. Having checked what David Fish is saying about the weather, then having made up your own mind as to whether or not there will be a hurricane, you go out to check the bike over. Horror of horrors, you’ve got a flat in your tubeless tyre, mounted on expensive cast alloy wheels. The usual thing is to whip it down to the bike shoppe and get their trained monkee to do the dirty graft for a poultry fee, but the shoppe is closed.
Tarnations! This means one will have to, finally attempt to do the task ones self, here’s how.

After ensuring it isn’t just a leaking valve, remove the wheel and locate the puncture, remember to mark its location:

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Set out some wooden blocks, upon which to rest the wheel rim, whilst keeping the sprocket/disc clear of the deck.

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Start by easing the first bead off its seat, a little at a time, so as not to apply to much stress to the delicate alloy:

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Once the bead has been broken from the seat, work around the tyre until all of one side is freed off. Then turn the wheel over and free off the other bead.

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With both beads unseated, then one can start to work the tyre over the rim, start with the tyre levers a couple of inches apart, and using one to hold the tyre in place, use the other to lever the bead over.

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As more bead is worked over, it becomes easier, until all of one side is done. It is then fairly easy to pull the wheel out of the tyre.

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Armed with a bicycle puncture repair kit, one can now set about fixing that nasty hole. Remember, RFM, Read the F**kin’ Manual:

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Dress the area to be patched, using an abrasive:

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Apply the vulcanizing solution:

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Whilst waiting for the solution to cure, set the wheel aside for cleaning, this is important, as it will make refitting the tyre a piece of piss.

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Following the instructions, apply the patch, and hold it firmly in place for several minutes. Once this id done, set about giving the inside of the wheel rim a darned good scrub:

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To aid tyre fitting, and in the absence of “tyre soap”, silicon grease makes an excellent lubricant.

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Smear your lubricant around both beads of the tyre.

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The wheel should virtually fall into the tyre for the first bead.

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Whilst the second bead will ease over the rim very smoothly and easily

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Having got your tyre back on the wheel, the tricky part is getting it to seal, in order to reseat the beads. It is best to remove the valve core, if this wasn’t removed at the start of the job. Sealing can usually be achieved by leaning on the tyre until the sound of the air passing the tyre goes quiet, WARNING: ensure there are no body parts or items of clothing likely to get trapped when the tyre seats.

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After seating, release the inflator and reinstall the valve core.

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Inflate to the required pressure

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And re-fit the wheel to your machine.

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All being well, the tyre will still be inflated in the moroning, ready for that nice ride out, that you’ve been waiting so long for.

Note: Phots will be reduced as and when my server stops dickin' aboot!

Re: Masterclass - Tubeless puncture repair

Posted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 4:08 pm
by Hooli
excellent masterclass mr ploppy

Re: Masterclass - Tubeless puncture repair

Posted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 4:36 pm
by jessplop
Elvis wrote: Thank you very much !
8-)

Re: Masterclass - Tubeless puncture repair

Posted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 4:50 pm
by The Mighty Gusset
I prefer to use some sort of rim protector when using tyre levers on alloy rims.
And a plug rather than a patch.
In the absence of proper plugs I've used a bit of knotted string, with a patch on top.

Re: Masterclass - Tubeless puncture repair

Posted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 4:56 pm
by jessplop
It being saturday evening, such things were not available, and as for a piece of string, a frayed knot!

Re: Masterclass - Tubeless puncture repair

Posted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 9:54 pm
by jimmy
I use washing up liquid as a tyre / rim lubricant as once it goes off it forms a good seal

Re: Masterclass - Tubeless puncture repair

Posted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 10:07 pm
by DAM
Washing up liquid is not a good idea when fitting tyres, it's not good for the rubber and will cause the rim to corrode.
Washing up liquid contains a lot of salt :!:

Re: Masterclass - Tubeless puncture repair

Posted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 10:16 pm
by Hunter
Liquid soap,s much better.

Re: Masterclass - Tubeless puncture repair

Posted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 1:39 pm
by jimmy
DAM wrote:Washing up liquid is not a good idea when fitting tyres, it's not good for the rubber and will cause the rim to corrode.
Washing up liquid contains a lot of salt :!:
It may or may not be mate, but Ive used it since 1981 with no ill effects. It is only in the last 4 or 5 years that i only ride for fun now, so before then I put in some reasonably high mileages

Re: Masterclass - Tubeless puncture repair

Posted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 5:07 pm
by iandusud
Maybe I don't know what I'm talking about because I've never had tubeless tyres on a motorbike (I thought this was a classic bike forum ;) ) but I always thought that one of the big advantages of tubeless tyres on bikes was that they can be repaired in situ without removing either the wheel or the tyre, using a plug. Am I talking hot air??

Ian